Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Understanding Care Issues of Older Immigrants", updates from Age-Friendly Communities Ontario Outreach Initiative, Alzheimer Society of Ontario, Baycrest, Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Regional Geriatrics Program, Senior Friendly Hospitals, news of a funding opportunity from the Canadian Frailty Network and a listing of upcoming events. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

Aging.com is a resource to help seniors and their families learn more about the specifics of planning for their later years.  They've provided facts(American based), on how to continue enjoying a long, healthy life as well as ways to reduce the risks of falling.

On November 23rd at the National Institute on Ageing at Ryerson University, this conference brings together experts, thought leaders, practitioners and delegates to "widen the lens" to look at the models, practices and stakeholders that will be need to support older adults to age in place. A varietyof age-friendly perspectives will be explored.

This paper examines specific intergeneraional and family dimensions of the immigrant experience in Canada, generally, and in particular, the Region of Peel, Ontario. This analysis is organized around the concept of lifespan or lifecycle groups.  A section on the migration stresses faced by couples is also included. 

This paper analyses the views of refugees and migrants1 who participated in The Forum’s activities between September 2013 and June 2014, and finds that loneliness and isolation are the major challenges that they face in the UK. Loneliness is extremely prevalent among migrants and refugees. Feeling of loneliness is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and reduced quality of life.

Late in life immigrants are often at risk of psychological stress, and social isolation because of language barriers, small social networks, and cultural differences from their host society. It has been noted that the social networks of those who migrate late in life tend to be very limited. The present study suggests that better family relation, social networking, financial support, and accessing health care would be the key to address the problem.

Don’t feel ready to seek out support and get out of your isolation? For many immigrants talking about feelings and seeking help is a challenge they must first overcome in order to feel less isolated.

Social isolation is a reality experienced by many seniors and particularly immigrant and refugee seniors. Even though it is not easy to recognize, it has significant health, social, and economic consequences. The Government of Canada has taken an active interest in the issue of social isolation as have provincial governments. At the community level, several organizations individually and in partnerships, have been actively engaged in offering programs and services to seniors at risk for social isolation.

The Age-Friendly Kitchener project was successful in achieving all of the originally planned deliverables.  This included establishing an advisory committee, developing a demographic profile, defining the project vision,scope and guiding principles, assessing age-friendly assets and gaps, engaging with the community and developing an action plan.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources related to age friendly communties (AFC).  Topics covered include AFC and the health of older adults, dementia friendly communities, housing options for older adults, community planning, resources to plan, implement and evaluate AFC initiatives, and more. 4 pages. 

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