SMART (Seniors Maintaining Active Roles Together)
FREE exercise classes for seniors who wish to improve strength, balance and flexibility regardless of their current ability level.  The program can help increase fitness levels, reduce social isolation and keep older adults on their feet.  No registration required. Call 613-634-0130 or 1-800-301-0076 for more information. Programs for Stroke Recovery, Parkinson's / Multiple Sclerosis and Arthritis are also offered in Kingston.

Free Fall Prevention Programs for People 65+
These 12 week programs include information on how to lower risk of falls and include an exercise component focused on balance and strength, Upcoming program locations and dates are listed below. Registration is required at the first session.
Call 613-634-0130 ext. 3414. or 1-800-301-0076 for more information

Your invited to the Alzheimer Society's Holiday Open House on Tuesday, December 5th from 1-4pm at 400 Elliott Ave. Unit 4, Kingston.  Snacks, refreshments, music, fun and friends. All are welcome! Call 613-544-3078 or 1-800-266-7516 for more information.

Join Sharon Lewis, Education and Support Coordinator with the Alzheimer Society of KFL&A on Dec 6th from 1-3pm at the Airheart Conference Room at Lennox & Addington County General Hospital to discuss the joys and challenges of supporting someone living with dementia.  Bring your questions!  Please RSVP 613-354-3301 ext 203 or kim@landahospice.ca

In collaboration with the Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat, Elder Abuse Ontario and Western University invite you to be part of a provincial initiative to engage our citizens in challenging social norms and encouraging bystander interventions in support of at-risk seniors.

Alzheimer’s is one of the main forms of dementia, which involves impaired brain function, the loss of short-term memory, and trouble completing even basic, familiar daily tasks. Caring for family members with this disease can take an emotional as well as financial toll on families. Arranging for the care of a person suffering from dementia can be complex and expensive. Adding to that complexity, patients are often unable to manage or understand their finances.

Odd or frustrating behaviors around clean clothes, bathing, oral care, hairstyling, and shaving seldom come "out of nowhere." Usually there's a trigger, and ways to work around it. Topics include wearing dirty clothes, forgetting to bath, and trouble grooming. 

As a person’s dementia develops, it is likely to have an impact on their ability to carry out certain activities. This factsheet looks at why it is important to remain active, including maintaining everyday skills. It gives tips to carers on how the person with dementia can continue to take part in everyday tasks, and suggests pastimes that might be suitable at different stages of dementia.

The winter holiday season (and the colder months which accompany it) can intensify feelings of sadness which aging seniors often experience. Most often it is not the holiday itself that cause these types of emotions among the elderly, rather the fact that the holidays tend to bring memories of earlier, perhaps happier times.

The holidays can be a great time for family togetherness and traditions, but they can also be lonely and difficult for those who have experienced losses. When it comes to holidays and the elderly, those who have lost spouses and have experienced a lot of life change can be especially prone to loneliness and depression. If you’d like to make the holidays a bit more special for your elderly loved one, or just for elders in your community, here are some ideas from our experts on holidays and the elderly.

Pages