Wed. Jan. 10, 2018 from 12-1pm EST.  Daniel McIsaac of Ottawa Hospital Research Institute wil talk about a project that aimed to identify differences between two leading frailty tools in their accuracy and ease of use for patients and clinicians. The findings will be provided to clinicans to help them choose which frailty tool to use before surgery to identify older patients at high-risk of bad outcomes after surgery. Register here.

The objective is to examine the relationship between loneliness and cognitive function and to explore the mediating role of physical health on the loneliness–cognition relationship in Chinese older adults (OAs).

This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effect of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine on the risk of falls, syncope and related events.

The authors of this longitudinal study aimed to evaluate if reduced executive function (EF) is a risk factor for future falls over the course of 5 years of follow-up. Their findings demonstrated that the risk of future falls was predicted by performance on EF and attention tests conducted 5 years earlier among community-dwelling older adults.

This paper reviews the importance of the gait-cognition inter-relationship in aging and presents evidence that gait assessments can provide a window into the understanding of cognitive function, dysfunction and fall risk in older adults.

The authors investigated hypnotic use in older dementia patients as a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures.  Through the use of a national inpatient database in Japan they found that short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase the risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients.

This prospective study aimed to identify modifiable risk facts for falling in older people with mild to moderate dementia.

The authors undertook a qualitative study involving thematic analysis to explore the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their family carers, about falling, fall risk and acceptability of fall prevention interventions. 

The authors provide an overview of issues of concern and consideration related to TBI in the elderly. The issue of age bias in the treatment received by older adults compared to younger adults is touched upon.

The authors of this review express concern by the lack of research in the area of mild TBI in this population and advise against extrapolating evidence from studies using younger adults due to the special needs of this population.

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