This thesis reviews the history of London, Ontario as the first Canadian city to be included in the WHO network of Age-Friendly Cities and discusses a project to determine how the lived experiences of older adults share their needs for programs and services that can facilitate social participation in the community.

The World Health Organization (WHO)’s Age-Friendly Community (AFC) initiative has gained worldwide momentum. Yet, measures have not been validated in regions with various levels of socio-economic development. This paper used a nationally representative dataset in China to (a) analyze community-level measures within the framework of AFC and (b) compare the age-friendliness between rural and urban settings in China. 

This pilot study used a “photovoice” approach, aiming to explore aspects of the housing environment considered by older people as important in facilitating ageing in place. It enabled participants to express their ideas through photographs

Canada has a large number of age-friendly initiatives; however, little is known about the effectiveness and outcomes of age-friendly community (AFC) initiatives. In addition, stakeholders report that they lack the capacity and tools to develop and conduct evaluations of their AFC initiatives.  The authors undertook an evidence-based, iterative consultation approach to develop indicators for AFCs.  They developed a final list of indicators and potential measure based on the result of their consultations and encourage communities to use these to evaluate and/or improve their AFC intiatives.  

This study aimed to better understand which and how key components of age-friendly communities best foster positive health, social participation and health equity in aging Canadians. 

The Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network website is a resource page where people can find information on living with RA. Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can make it difficult to live a full, healthy life. Fortunately, there are many ways to manage these symptoms — from medications to lifestyle changes. 

Paige Moorhouse, Tara Sampalli and Ashley Harnish presented this webinar about their community-based study where they assessed the implementation feasibility and impact of the "Frailty Portal" in the identification, raising awareness of, care planning and delivery of appropriate care for the frail population in community primary care practice.  Watch the recording of the webinar here.

On Sept. 13th at 12EST, Rose Geist and Richard Shulman will present about how Trillium Health Partners (THP) and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have successfully used a utilization management tool, the Level of Care Utilization System for Psychiatric and Addiction Services (LOCUS) in their adult clinical mental health populations. Both hospitals now plan to implement the LOCUS in the seniors’ populations as a quality improvement project by adding a frailty dimension to the LOCUS tool. This study assessed how well three specific tools, the “Clinical Frailty Scale”, the “LOCUS”, and the “6 D’s” could identify the current level of healthcare utilization for older adults with medical and psychiatric co-morbidities. Register here.

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