March 5-6, 2018 in Niagra Falls, Ontario the Research Institute for Aging presents Walk with Me: Changing the Culture of Aging in Canada. This conference brings together older adults/residents, care partners, educators, policy makers, students and researchers from all over the country to learn with and from each other about how to enhance the journey of aging across the continuum of care and community living. To learn more or to register click here.

This information sheet provides an overview of why climate change matters for health and the ways in which it puts older adults at greater risk of poor health outcomes.  

This guide from the American Psychological Association, Climate for Health and ecoAmerica provides an overview of climate change, its impact on mental health and recommendations for addressing those mental health impacts. There is a section specific to the increased risks posed to older adults.

This position paper discusses how the climate change is creating an increase in vulnerabilities to older adults across the planet. 

Alzheimer’s is one of the main forms of dementia, which involves impaired brain function, the loss of short-term memory, and trouble completing even basic, familiar daily tasks. Caring for family members with this disease can take an emotional as well as financial toll on families. Arranging for the care of a person suffering from dementia can be complex and expensive. Adding to that complexity, patients are often unable to manage or understand their finances.

Odd or frustrating behaviors around clean clothes, bathing, oral care, hairstyling, and shaving seldom come "out of nowhere." Usually there's a trigger, and ways to work around it. Topics include wearing dirty clothes, forgetting to bath, and trouble grooming. 

As a person’s dementia develops, it is likely to have an impact on their ability to carry out certain activities. This factsheet looks at why it is important to remain active, including maintaining everyday skills. It gives tips to carers on how the person with dementia can continue to take part in everyday tasks, and suggests pastimes that might be suitable at different stages of dementia.

The winter holiday season (and the colder months which accompany it) can intensify feelings of sadness which aging seniors often experience. Most often it is not the holiday itself that cause these types of emotions among the elderly, rather the fact that the holidays tend to bring memories of earlier, perhaps happier times.

If you believe that your parent, spouse, friend or neighbor may be depressed, there are steps that you can take to help lift their spirits. You are probably busy with your own holiday preparations, but it’s important to remember what the holiday season is truly about. Simplifying some of your plans will allow you to focus on what really matters: the important people in your life. Use these ideas to brighten up a loved one’s winter season.

Social isolation is more than just the holiday blues; seniors who are not engaged with their communities can suffer physically.  Studies have found that older adults who do not feel they are valued members of society can slip into depression, withdrawing from others and failing to eat or sleep properly, get regular exercise or keep doctor appointments.  Social isolation and loneliness can increase the risk of mortality in older adults and may lead to a quicker cognitive decline in some seniors.

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