Seasonal Affective Disorder, otherwise known as SAD, is a form of depression that affects a person during the same season each year. For example, if you get depressed each winter, you may have SAD. It seems to be the most common amongst women, people who have a close relative previously diagnosed with SAD, or people who live in areas where winter days are very short or there are big changes in the amount of daylight during different seasons.

With all of these hazards ahead in this upcoming season, it’s important that caregivers for their elderly loved ones prepare ahead of time. Taking precautions during the fall will alleviate stress, reduce risks of depression and allow our loved ones to enjoy this season and all it’s festivities to the fullest.

Caregivers may notice a sudden change in mood, appetite, or energy level in their loved one, other symptoms may involve, sadness, sleep disturbances or lethargy.  The key in assessing for SAD is to tune into sudden changes that seem to revolve around the cold, dark months of winter.  Of course, any symptoms of depression should be reported to the physician regardless of the season.  

November 22, 2017 - Toronto. Elder Abuse Ontario invites you to join them for an interactive day of knowledge exchange, to learn about ground breaking research and successful international initiatives addressing abuse of older adults. Keynote Speakers from Australia, USA and Canada will join Ontario's leading experts to share their experiences in the delivery of programs/services, advocacy, and current research to address the complexities of abuse issues towards older adults. To register or for more information click here.

This presentation aims to raise awareness of and enhance the care for people at end of life including how to understand how cultural factors influence end of life decision making.  

Quality palliative care helps you honour your culture, spirituality and traditions. At LivingMyCulture.ca, people from various cultures share their stories and wisdom about living with serious illness, end of life and grief to support others.

The following is a resource guide created for seniors’ caretakers designed to provide moving advice that touches on the unique needs of seniors and their caregivers when moving to a senior living community.

Social isolation can often pose serious health threats to the senior population, and it’s more common than most people may think. It’s important to foster an environment where seniors can stay socially engaged as they get older. Here are some ways to promote social health, connectedness and help seniors avoid social isolation.

Dr. Leslie Kernisan isa board-certified geriatrician — a medical doctor specialized in healthcare for older adults. On this website, she share practical information to help you address problems that often keep aging adults from enjoying better health, well-being, and independence. This page posts Q&A for caregivers, this particular question referring to elderly incompetence. 

This guide is designed to make the downsizing process as simple as possible for seniors and their loved ones. It will help prepare both house and senior for the transition, as well as offer advice to loved ones on the duties they can help perform. Keep the lines of communication open, take it one step at a time, and don’t rush into anything before you’re ready.

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