This resource is intended to help raise awareness of issues of senior abuse in the lives of senior Aboriginal women, their families and communities. It is meant to help promote the safety and well-being of our seniors and Elders, both women and men, and to honour them as they would be traditionally.

Financial abuse is the most common form of elder abuse in Canada. Financial abuse can happen at any time, but it will often start after a health crisis or after the death of a spouse, partner or close friend. People who are alone, lonely or in poor health are more vulnerable.

The CASE tool was created by Myrna Reis and Daphne Nahmiash and is designed to be administered to caregivers of elderly individuals. It comprises eight yes or no questions, and can make a handy tool to use in psychosocial assessments if you are a counsellor or a case manager.

Tools included in the list are used in practice and have undergone some form of psychometric testing, with published results. 

Canadian criminal law does not mandate the reporting of elder abuse on a national basis. The Criminal Code1 does not explicitly define “elder abuse” as a discrete crime, nor does it provide any legal mechanism or requirement for the reporting of abuse. Elder abuse, when it forms the substance of a criminal offence, may be reported to a law enforcement agency at the discretion of the reporter, as with any other crime.

The United Nations: Human Rights, 1991.The General Assembly adopted the United Nations Principles for Older Persons.The document outlined specific older person’s Rights regarding: independence, participation, care, self-fulfillment and dignity.

Research has shown that the most successful fall prevention programs focus on the conditions of the individual, the conditions of the environment, and the interaction between the two. There are a lot of opportunities in the design of the home, spanning from simple safety measures to remodeling, so that seniors can enjoy their days without exerting a lot of mental energy on fall prevention.

The Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network website is a resource page where people can find information on living with RA. Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can make it difficult to live a full, healthy life. Fortunately, there are many ways to manage these symptoms — from medications to lifestyle changes. 

A food blog has put together this comprehensive guide encompassing the cognitive, emotional, and other health-related benefits of cooking for people with Alzheimer’s disease, how to create a safe environment for cooking and baking, ways caregivers can assist to make the activity enjoyable, and addressing eating challenges that may arise among individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease affects about 5.4 million Americans, about 5.2 million of which are 65 and older. It can be your grandparent, your cousin, your sibling or even your parent who faces the diagnosis. Eventually, those with Alzheimer’s require round-the-clock care, and for many families, that means taking the loved one into their own home.

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