This evidence brief reports on the issues of equitable access to assistive technologies which is of importance to many older Canadians.

This report from the National Institute on Ageing makes 5 evidence-informed recommendations, including: recognize all caregivers with a common definition; support caregivers with financial assistance and training, change workplace cultures to recognize and support the unique challenges Canadian caregivers face; and develop national standards that both governments and employers can use to measure how well we are meeting the needs of workng caregivers.

This chapter from “A Call to Action for Health Reform” describes the extent of chronic illness in America and its implications for the health care system. Four out of five Americans over the age of 50 suffer from at least one chronic condition.  The authors include information on particular chronic illnesses along with strategies for successful care management.

This report from the Primary Health Care Advisory Group in Australia details the evidence for change and makes recommendations for the broad adoption of a new model of care and reforms to better meet the needs of those with chronic and complex health care needs. Many insights and recommendations may prove insightful for providers in other parts of the world.

This Australian report gives a comprehensive look at the need to focus on older people with chronic health conditions, what factors contribute to problems for these people, how care can be improved and suggestions for moving forward.

This report is an outcome of the project ICARE4EU and provides an overview of how European countries are coping with the challenges of multimorbidity, different integrated care programmes, methodological considerations and implications.  

This study by CIHI  (Canadian Institute for Health Information) examined the reported experiences of seniors in Canada being treated for chronic conditions in primary health care settings.

The authors worked with a defined set of 32 chronic conditions drawn from a large household survey to find that the prevalence rates for almost half of the conditions increase with age and that those age patterns are strong. If the rates for each age group remained constant they projected that the rates for almost all conditions that are associated mostly with old age would rise by more than 25 percent.

This report from the Health Council of Canada provides an overview of issues related to the health disparities between First Nations, Inuit and Métis senior populations.  In comparison to the larger Canadian population, a significantly larger proportion of Aboriginal seniors live on low incomes and in poor health, with multiple chronic conditions and disabilities. 68 pages. Last reviewed February 2017.

This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada, including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics such as their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity, Aboriginal identity and geographic region.  39 pages. Last reviewed February 2017.

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