This article discusses strategies for improving adherence to treatment plans which includes the promotion of simplified medical regimes, the use of aids and more.

The authors state that the current health care system relies on the assumption that older populations have well-developed skills required for self-management of chronic disease. Clinicians must acknowledge the relationship between cognition and self-management and improve their ability to identify and respond to the causes of treatment non-adherence particularly as they related to dementia.

Alzheimer’s is one of the main forms of dementia, which involves impaired brain function, the loss of short-term memory, and trouble completing even basic, familiar daily tasks. Caring for family members with this disease can take an emotional as well as financial toll on families. Arranging for the care of a person suffering from dementia can be complex and expensive. Adding to that complexity, patients are often unable to manage or understand their finances.

As a person’s dementia develops, it is likely to have an impact on their ability to carry out certain activities. This factsheet looks at why it is important to remain active, including maintaining everyday skills. It gives tips to carers on how the person with dementia can continue to take part in everyday tasks, and suggests pastimes that might be suitable at different stages of dementia.

This presentation by Dr. John Puxty provides a summary of age-related changes in memory, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia, delirium and depression in older adults. Last reviewed November 2017. 66 slides.

This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effect of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine on the risk of falls, syncope and related events.

The authors investigated hypnotic use in older dementia patients as a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures.  Through the use of a national inpatient database in Japan they found that short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase the risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients.

This article speaks to the role of occupational therapy in assessing the person, the environment, and the occupation of people with dementia to prevent falls while improving independence and participation in daily activities.

This prospective study aimed to identify modifiable risk facts for falling in older people with mild to moderate dementia.

The authors undertook a qualitative study involving thematic analysis to explore the perceptions of older people with mild dementia and mild cognitive impairment and their family carers, about falling, fall risk and acceptability of fall prevention interventions. 

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